#halehōʻikeʻike

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This week the Haleakalā National Park Cultural Resource Team is highlighting a special park project that we worked on in cooperation with the Kīpahulu District staff and community, Interpretation Division, and subject matter experts throughout Maui! Ten new waysides have been installed in Kīpahulu District. The waysides interpret the history of the district, and the unique cultural and natural resources of Kīpahulu. This week we are featuring the 4 new waysides that can be found in front of the Kīpahulu Visitor Center. Topics include the ahupua‘a land management system, the effects of the 1848 Mahele (divide), which privatized land throughout Hawai‘i, the Kīpahulu Valley Biological Reserve, and the endemic Hawaiian stream creatures that live in the Palikea and Pīpīwai streams of ‘Ohe‘o Gulch. Next week we will preview the 6 waysides that can be found along Kūloa Point Trail. We hope you can take advantage of the park’s fee free day this Monday January 15, 2018 in honor of Martin Luther King, Jr. Day and check out the new signage! (REH) #haleakalā #NPS #npsmuseum #haleakalācollection #ahupua ‘a #mahele #KīpahuluBiologicalReserve #‘Ohe‘oGulch #HALEmuseum #halehōʻikeʻike
Baby Nene are our favorite! Come see them with us! Visit www.skylinehawaii.com/haleakala 😍 . . #Repost @haleakalanps ・・・ New year, new nēnē! It is that time of year again for nēnē (Branta sandvicensis) to nest and have their goslings. Nēnē geese are endemic to Hawai‘i and are endangered. From October to April, female nēnē will build nests and lay eggs. Once the goslings hatch, they will remain with their parents until the following breeding season in October. Here at the park we are starting to see nēnē families around. It is important to remember when visiting Haleakalā National Park to give the nēnē families space and observe them from a safe distance. Another way to help protect the nēnē is to not feed or touch them and drive slowly within the park – there may be a nēnē on the road! If you need a New Year’s resolution, you can pledge “He kia‘i nēnē au” (I am the guardian of the nēnē) and help protect these endangered Hawaiian birds. (KM) #objectoftheweek #haleakalā #NPS #npsmuseum #haleakalācollection #slowdownfornene #HALEmuseum #halehōʻikeʻike # iamtheguardianofthenēnē
New year, new nēnē! It is that time of year again for nēnē (Branta sandvicensis) to nest and have their goslings. Nēnē geese are endemic to Hawai‘i and are endangered. From October to April, female nēnē will build nests and lay eggs. Once the goslings hatch, they will remain with their parents until the following breeding season in October. Here at the park we are starting to see nēnē families around. It is important to remember when visiting Haleakalā National Park to give the nēnē families space and observe them from a safe distance. Another way to help protect the nēnē is to not feed or touch them and drive slowly within the park – there may be a nēnē on the road! If you need a New Year’s resolution, you can pledge “He kia‘i nēnē au” (I am the guardian of the nēnē) and help protect these endangered Hawaiian birds. (KM) #objectoftheweek #haleakalā #NPS #npsmuseum #haleakalācollection #slowdownfornene #HALEmuseum #halehōʻikeʻike # iamtheguardianofthenēnē
‘Ohe makai (Reynoldsia sandwicensis Gray) is a native Hawaiian tree that is rarely found today. ‘Ohe makai is one of the few Hawaiian trees that is deciduous and will drop its leaves annually. This tree inhabits lowland dry forests, but is occasionally seen in coastal mesic and mixed mesic forests. The Hawaiians used the wood of the ‘ohe makai to make stilts for the game kukuluae'o, in which a person would try to balance on stilts. The game is named after the long-legged endangered Hawaiian bird kukuluae’o (Himantopus mexicanus knudseni). The Hawaiians also used the tree for medicinal purposes. Mothers would eat the fruit of the tree and transfer the medicinal properties through breastmilk to their babies sick with pāʻaoʻao (weaknesses) and ‘ea (thrush). For more information about the Haleakalā collection, please visit our webpage at https://www.nps.gov/hale/learn/historyculture/collections.htm. (KEM) #haleakalā #NPS #npsmuseum #haleakalācollection #HALEmuseum #halehōʻikeʻike #haleherbaruim #‘ohemakai #hawaiianplants ­
Credit @haleakalanps . . Fit! 📸 #NicePic . . This week the Hawaiian Islands have been experiencing cold weather in higher elevations, with snowfall on Big Island at the summit of Mauna Kea. Yes, it does snow here! Pictured is snow on the summit of Haleakalā in 1967. It snows nearly every year in the Hawaiian Islands, but only at the very summits of our highest volcanoes: Mauna Loa, Mauna Kea, and Haleakalā. For people that are trying to get away from long cold winters, this might sound dreadful. But, for people that have lived in Hawai‘i all their lives, snow is a rare delight. For more information about the Haleakalā collection, please visit our webpage at https://www.nps.gov/hale/learn/historyculture/collections.htm. (KEM) #haleakalā #mauihistory #NPS #npsmuseum #haleakalācollection #HALEmuseum #halehōʻikeʻike #historicphotos #snowinhawaii
#Repost @haleakalanps ・・・ This week the Hawaiian Islands have been experiencing cold weather in higher elevations, with snowfall on Big Island at the summit of Mauna Kea. Yes, it does snow here! Pictured is snow on the summit of Haleakalā in 1967. It snows nearly every year in the Hawaiian Islands, but only at the very summits of our highest volcanoes: Mauna Loa, Mauna Kea, and Haleakalā. For people that are trying to get away from long cold winters, this might sound dreadful. But, for people that have lived in Hawai‘i all their lives, snow is a rare delight. For more information about the Haleakalā collection, please visit our webpage at https://www.nps.gov/hale/learn/historyculture/collections.htm. (KEM) #haleakalā #mauihistory #NPS #npsmuseum #haleakalācollection #HALEmuseum #halehōʻikeʻike #historicphotos #snowinhawaii
This week the Hawaiian Islands have been experiencing cold weather in higher elevations, with snowfall on Big Island at the summit of Mauna Kea. Yes, it does snow here! Pictured is snow on the summit of Haleakalā in 1967. It snows nearly every year in the Hawaiian Islands, but only at the very summits of our highest volcanoes: Mauna Loa, Mauna Kea, and Haleakalā. For people that are trying to get away from long cold winters, this might sound dreadful. But, for people that have lived in Hawai‘i all their lives, snow is a rare delight. For more information about the Haleakalā collection, please visit our webpage at https://www.nps.gov/hale/learn/historyculture/collections.htm. (KEM) #haleakalā #mauihistory #NPS #npsmuseum #haleakalācollection #HALEmuseum #halehōʻikeʻike #historicphotos #snowinhawaii
The ko‘i, or adze (stone ax-like tool), was used to harvest trees and carve canoes and ki‘i (statues). The process for making ko‘i is labor intensive. Following the traditional method, the kāko‘i (adze maker) obtains a piece of dense basalt stone. The kāko‘i then chips away at the stone with a haku kā ko‘i (chipping stone) giving it a triangular shape. Once shaped the ko‘i is polished by applying to a hoana (grind-stone), which is sprinkled with sand and water. The ko‘i is then lashed to a wooden handle. Local artist and master carver Kenneth Hiraoka has created a ko‘i (pictured) inspired by those found in Haleakalā National Park. This ko‘i is on display at the Haleakalā Visitor Center in the Summit District from now until mid-January, 2018. For more information about the Haleakalā collection, please visit our webpage at https://www.nps.gov/hale/learn/historyculture/collections.htm. (KEM) #haleakalā #NPS #npsmuseum #haleakalācollection #HALEmuseum #halehōʻikeʻike #adze #HALEexhibit #kennethhiraoka #Koʻi #hawaiiancraft #hawaiiancarvings
“Explore, Learn, and Protect" is the motto for the National Park Service junior ranger. This program offers young visitors the opportunity to join the National Park Service "family." To become a junior ranger, a young visitor must complete a series of activities while at the park and share his or her answers with a park ranger. Once completed, he or she will then receive an official junior ranger badge and certificate. Yosemite National Park’s Junior Explorer Nature Program in the 1930’s was the predecessor for the Junior Ranger Program. This program has since evolved and has been influenced by the U.S. Forest Service’s Junior Ranger Program which started in the 1950’s.Today, the Junior Ranger Program is active in most National Parks. Pictured here is a 1996 Junior Ranger activity book and badge from Haleakalā National Park with original sketches by Sophie Cayless. For more information about the Haleakalā collection, please visit our webpage at https://www.nps.gov/hale/learn/historyculture/collections.htm. Haleakalā’s current Junior Ranger Program is accessible here: https://www.nps.gov/hale/learn/kidsyouth/beajuniorranger.htm. (KEM) #haleakalā #NPS #npsmuseum #haleakalācollection #HALEmuseum #halehōʻikeʻike #juniorranger #NPShistory #findyourpark
East Maui is home to some of the most rare and endangered plants in Hawai‘i. Māhoe (Alectryon macrococcus var. macrococcus) is a species of flowering tree in the Sapindaceae (soapberry) family. Māhoe is endemic to the Hawaiian Islands. It is one of two varieties of Alectryon macrococcus and both are extremely rare. This species is critically endangered due to fire, grazing animals, insects, and rats. This specimen was collected in mesic forest outside of the park and the species has never been documented inside of the park boundary. There is no documented use of this native hardwood by early Hawaiians, possibly due to the rarity of the tree. However, Native Hawaiians ate the fruit of the tree. For more information about the Haleakalā collection, please visit our webpage at https://www.nps.gov/hale/learn/historyculture/collections.htm. (KEM) #objectoftheweek #haleakalā #NPS #npsmuseum #haleakalācollection #HALEmuseum #halehōʻikeʻike #HALEherbarium #alectryon #macrococcus #endemic #māhoe
Haleakalā National Park has installed its second rotating exhibit in the case up at Haleakalā Visitor Center! The new exhibit is entitled: Discovering the Past of Haleakalā: Early Archeology of Haleakalā National Park. We share the discoveries of anthropologists Kenneth P. Emory and Lloyd J. Soehren, and what their findings have revealed about past human land use of this sacred place. We worked with a contemporary Native Hawaiian Artist and Craftsman, Kenneth Hiraoka, who has created a ko‘i (Hawaiian adze or stone ax-like tool) and makau (fishhook) inspired by the artifacts found by archeologists in the park. We hope that your journey to the summit of Haleakalā will include checking out our display case to learn about the archeology of Haleakalā National Park! (REH) #HVCexhibit #haleakalā #NPS #npsmuseum #haleakalācollection #HALEmuseum #halehōʻikeʻike #earlyarcheology #ko ‘i #makau #HawaiianCarvings
Anthropologist Lloyd J. Soehren came to Maui in the early 1960’s and surveyed several sites around Maui, including Haleakalā National Park. This major expedition was sponsored by the Bernice Pauahi Bishop Museum, Hawai‘i’s largest museum founded in 1889. The old cartridge pictured was found at a site in the Haleakalā wilderness. These types of bullets are used with bolt-action rifles. This particular bullet casing was manufactured by the Remington Arms Company, which was established in 1816 by Eliphalet Remington. During World War 1 the company produced ammunition and weapons under contract for several allied powers. Besides being used for military purposes, this type of ammunition was used for sport. This casing was possibly used for hunting in the Haleakalā wilderness. However, today hunting is not permitted inside park boundaries. Next week a new exhibit displaying additional artifacts from Soehren’s survey will be on display at the Haleakalā Visitor Center. For more information about the Haleakalā collection, please visit our webpage at https://www.nps.gov/hale/learn/historyculture/collections.htm. (BTS) #archeology #remingtonarms #haleakalā #mauihistory #NPS #npsmuseum #haleakalācollection #HALEmuseum #halehōʻikeʻike
Every year to open the Maui Fair, there is a parade down Ka‘ahumanu Avenue with more than 10,000 spectators. Yesterday, the staff of Haleakalā National Park participated in the Maui Fair Parade with staff dressed as ‘ope‘ape‘a (Hawaiian Hoary Bat),‘ua‘u (Hawaiian Petrel), ‘i‘iwi (scarlet honeycreeper), pinao (Hawaiian damselfly), and of course flying nēnē (Hawaiian goose). The Maui Fair has been around since 1916 and is an annual highlight for the Maui County community. Today, more than 100,000 people partake in the Maui Fair. The fair was historically located on Pu‘unene Avenue, but has since moved to its current location at the War Memorial Complex in Wailuku. The fair showcases handcrafted items such as food and crafts from the community. Entertainment ranges from rides, to comedy acts, live music, and exhibits. In the early 1960’s, Haleakalā National Park participated at the Maui Fair by showcasing exhibits about the natural history of the park (see photos). For more information about the Haleakalā collection, please visit our webpage at https://www.nps.gov/hale/learn/historyculture/collections.htm. (KEM) #Mauifair #Mauifairparade #haleakalā #mauihistory #NPS #npsmuseum #haleakalācollection #HALEmuseum #halehōʻikeʻike #historicphotos
#Repost @haleakalanps ・・・ This week, the Haleakalā Museum highlights its ornithology (study of birds) collection with a stuffed nēnē from 1968. The endangered nēnē (pronounced nay-nay) or Hawaiian goose is the official bird of Hawai'i and is exclusively found in the wild on the islands of Hawai'i, Maui, Moloka’i and Kaua’i. In the 1950’s there were only about 30 nēnē in the wild and today the nēnē is one of the rarest geese in the world. The major cause of death in the wild for the nēnē is predation by mongooses, cats, and dogs or getting hit by cars. Today, with hard work and dedication there are an estimate of 500 nēnē on Maui with 250 living in Haleakalā National Park. To help protect the nēnē please do not feed or touch them and drive slowly within the park – there may be a nēnē on the road! (KM) #objectoftheweek #haleakala #NPS #npsmuseum #haleakalacollection #slowdownfornene #halemuseum #halehōʻikeʻike
Rhinella marina (Linnaeus, 1758) commonly known as the cane toad, is an amphibian that was introduced to Hawai‘i in the 1930s to control pests in the sugar cane fields. These toads are considered to be invasive species, as they are highly toxic and threaten the native insect and bird populations. The cane toad exhibited is housed in ethanol alcohol, which is used to preserve museum specimens. This process allows for the specimen to be well-kept for hundreds of years, even keeping its natural color! For more information about the Haleakalā collection, please visit our webpage at https://www.nps.gov/hale/learn/historyculture/collections.htm. (KEM) #objectoftheweek #haleakalā #NPS #npsmuseum #haleakalācollection #HALEmuseum #halehōʻikeʻike #canetoad #naturalhistory #Rhinellamarina #toad #sugarcanefields #hawaiianhistory
Artist Natalie Westbrook (@nataliewestbrookstudio ) was Haleakalā National Park’s artist-in-residence for 2013. As part of the program, she was invited to live and work at the park and interpret its resources in her own unique and abstract style. Her work titled "Sliding Sands" is a scenic view of Haleakalā Wilderness Area as seen from the start of the Keonehe‘ehe‘e (Sliding Sands) Trail. The black forms at the bottom of the page are abstract images of the Haleakalā silversword (Argyroxiphium sandwicense subsp. macrocephalum) that the artist sketched at Split Rock, further down the trail. Westbrook was inspired by the colors of Haleakalā, including the Kīpahulu section of the park. For more information about the Haleakalā collection, please visit our webpage at https://www.nps.gov/hale/learn/historyculture/collections.htm. (KEM) #objectoftheweek #haleakalā #NPS #npsmuseum #haleakalācollection #HALEmuseum #halehōʻikeʻike #NatalieWestbrook #artistinresidence #collage #slidingsandstrail #silversword #Keonehe ‘ehe‘e
Keonehe‘ehe‘e translates to “sliding sands,” which is what the trail is commonly called today. Sliding Sands Trail begins at the southwest rim of the crater near the Haleakalā Visitor Center. Keonehe‘ehe‘e pre-dates the park; it was mapped as early as 1869. The trail was historically used to drive cattle through the crater during the ranching period of Haleakalā (late 1800s to the ca. 1920s). Throughout the 1930s and early 1940s, the Civilian Conservation Corps (CCC) laborers worked on a variety of projects within the Haleakalā section of Hawai‘i National Park. A large portion of the work was devoted to the reconstruction and maintenance of the wilderness trails of Haleakalā. Keonehe‘ehe‘e Trail was one of these projects. The trail has changed little since the CCC era. For more information about the Haleakalā collection, please visit our webpage at https://www.nps.gov/hale/learn/historyculture/collections.htm. (KM) #objectoftheweek #haleakalā #NPS #npsmuseum #haleakalācollection #HALEmuseum #slidingsandstrail #Keonehe ‘ehe‘e #halehōʻikeʻike #hikemaui #CCC #historicphotos
The Udara blackburni (Koa Butterfly) is part of the Lycaenidae (gossamer-winged butterflies) family. The U. blackburni is endemic to Hawai‘i, meaning it is only found here, and nowhere else on Earth. This is one of only two species of butterfly that are native to Hawai‘i. The primary host plant for the U. blackburni is the koa (Acacia koa) tree. The Koa Butterfly is also called Blackburn’s Blue, because the upper sides of its wings are blue! For more information about the Haleakalā collection, please visit our webpage at https://www.nps.gov/hale/learn/historyculture/collections.htm. #objectoftheweek #haleakalā #NPS #npsmuseum #haleakalācollection #HALEmuseum #halehōʻikeʻike #HALEentomology #Udarablackburni #koabutterfly
Sometimes I write things.... Mahalo nui to Ulukau for their great resources! #Repost @haleakalanps (@get_repost ) ・・・ Early voyagers to Hawai‘i admired kānaka ‘ōiwi (Native Hawaiian’s) superb dentition. But, their dental regiment was very different from that which many follow today. They did not own a palaki niho or toothbrush. Instead, their oral hygiene relied on resources from the ‘āina (land). Sugarcane, salt, and charcoal served as cleaning agents for their teeth, while wood and bone toothpicks helped remove leftover food. When toothaches occurred, the juice of kūkaepua‘a leaves (Digitaria setigera), or itchy crabgrass, were mixed with salt and served as a remedy for the pain. Toothbrushes were introduced to Hawai‘i following European contact. Pictured above are wooden toothbrush fragments collected during a survey at Haleakalā. Look closely, and you’ll see the word “FRANCE” printed on the handle. Perhaps this toothbrush is a product from French trade with Hawai‘i. For more information about the Haleakalā collection, please visit our webpage at https://www.nps.gov/hale/learn/historyculture/collections.htm. (DKH) #objectoftheweek #haleakalā #NPS #npsmuseum #haleakalācollection #HALEmuseum #halehōʻikeʻike #HALEarcheology #toothbrush
Early voyagers to Hawai‘i admired kānaka ‘ōiwi (Native Hawaiian’s) superb dentition. But, their dental regiment was very different from that which many follow today. They did not own a palaki niho or toothbrush. Instead, their oral hygiene relied on resources from the ‘āina (land). Sugarcane, salt, and charcoal served as cleaning agents for their teeth, while wood and bone toothpicks helped remove leftover food. When toothaches occurred, the juice of kūkaepua‘a leaves (Digitaria setigera), or itchy crabgrass, were mixed with salt and served as a remedy for the pain. Toothbrushes were introduced to Hawai‘i following European contact. Pictured above are wooden toothbrush fragments collected during a survey at Haleakalā. Look closely, and you’ll see the word “FRANCE” printed on the handle. Perhaps this toothbrush is a product from French trade with Hawai‘i. For more information about the Haleakalā collection, please visit our webpage at https://www.nps.gov/hale/learn/historyculture/collections.htm. (DKH) #objectoftheweek #haleakalā #NPS #npsmuseum #haleakalācollection #HALEmuseum #halehōʻikeʻike #HALEarcheology #toothbrush
Pterodroma sandwichensis or the ‘ua‘u (Hawaiian Petrel) is a large, sooty-colored (dark grey-brown and white) endemic Hawaiian seabird. The ‘ua‘u make a variety of calls, one sounding just like its name: oo-AHoo. The ‘ua‘u was once found on many of the Hawaiian Islands, but due to habitat loss and predation by feral cats, mongooses, and rats, the ‘ua‘u is now a federally listed endangered species. The largest managed population of ‘ua‘u is now located in Haleakalā National Park. The ‘ua‘u diet mostly consists of squid, but also includes fish and crustaceans. ‘Ua‘u like to nest underground in existing tunnels or will burrow into the ground, forming new tunnels. The ‘ua‘u mate for life and the females only lay one egg a year. Once the baby ‘ua‘u hatch, the parents go out to feed during the day and return back to the nest at night. New research shows that the ‘ua‘u can travel as far as Alaska and Japan during feeding trips. Haleakalā National Park actively works to reduce the number of predators of the ‘ua‘u and other rare Hawaiian birds, like the endangered nēnē (Hawaiian goose). For more information about the Haleakalā collection, please visit our webpage at https://www.nps.gov/hale/learn/historyculture/collections.htm. #haleakalā #NPS #npsmuseum #haleakalācollection #HALEmuseum #halehōʻikeʻike #‘ua‘u #hawaiianpetrel #hawaiianendemicbirds
Vaccinium reticulatum Sm., also known as ‘ōhelo ‘ai (Hawaiian blueberry) belongs to the Ericaceae (heather) family and is endemic to Hawaii. ‘Ōhelo ‘ai likes to grow at altitudes of roughly 2,000-12,000 ft. on lava flows and freshly disturbed volcanic ash. The multi-colored fruit that grows on the ‘ōhelo ‘ai is tart like a cranberry and is an important food source for the nēnē (Branta sandvicensis) or Hawaiian goose. Traditionally, ‘ōhelo ‘ai was considered a sacred plant, and was to be offered to the fire goddess Pele before humans consumed the berries. According to some sources, the High Chiefess Kapi‘olani, who had converted to Christianity, once famously defied Pele at Kīlauea caldera by eating the berries without offering them to Pele first. For more information about the Haleakalā collection, please visit our webpage at https://www.nps.gov/hale/learn/historyculture/collections.htm #haleakalā #NPS #npsmuseum #haleakalācollection #HALEmuseum #halehōʻikeʻike #HALEherbarium #ōhelo ‘ai #vaccinium
Coleotichus blackburniae (koa bug) is a rare endemic "stinkless" stink bug found on the islands of Hawai‘i, Maui, O‘ahu, Kaua‘i, and Moloka‘i. C. blackburniae is part of the Hemiptera order (the “true bugs”) and is the largest endemic “true bug” in Hawai‘i. C. blackburniae is found on native koa (Acacia koa) and a'ali'i (Dodonaea viscosa). Adult females lay their eggs on the leaves and fruits of these tree and shrub species, where the larvae develop for an estimated 38 days. Female C. blackburniae are estimated to live for 80 days and begin mating 30 days after hatching. For more information about the Haleakalā collection, please visit our webpage at https://www.nps.gov/hale/learn/historyculture/collections.htm #objectoftheweek #haleakalā #NPS #npsmuseum #haleakalācollection #HALEmuseum #halehōʻikeʻike # koabug #HALEentomology
On August 13, 1947, the Haleakalā Mountain Lodge (renamed the Silversword Inn in 1958) opened under a business concession permit in the Puʻunianiau area of the park. Several of the buildings previously constructed in June 1942 by the U.S. Army were converted into guest rooms and employees’ quarters for the Haleakalā Mountain Lodge. At the time, single rooms ran at a rate of $10.00 per day, or $65.00 per week. Breakfast costed $1.50, $2.00 for lunch, and $2.50-$4.00 for dinner. In 1961, concession services at Haleakalā were terminated and the lodge and food service buildings vacated. The following year, many of these buildings were leased to the Atomic Energy Commission for staff housing. Today Puʻunianiau serves as the park maintenance and resource management baseyard, with offices, greenhouses, stable and pasture for the park mules, maintenance garage, and storage facilities. For more information about the Haleakalā collection, please visit our webpage at https://www.nps.gov/hale/learn/historyculture/collections.htm #SilverswordInn #HaleakalāMountainLodge #haleakalā #Puʻunianiau #NPS #npsmuseum #haleakalācollection #HALEmuseum #halehōʻikeʻike #historicbuildings
Haleakalā National Park’s sculpture entitled The Silversword has a new home! Yesterday, it was delivered to Kahului Airport and installed in the arrivals area for display. The sculpture was made for the park in 1975 by local Maui artist Gwendolyn Brush, and was long displayed in the Headquarters Visitor Center. The metal sculpture was hand-welded from copper, bronze and steel and sits on a rock sourced from the cinder pits of Kula. The sculpture is a representation of the silversword plant, or 'āhinahina, which is an endangered species that is found on the cinder slopes of Haleakalā Crater. It is depicted in full bloom. The artist believes that the 'āhinahina "adorns Haleakalā like a piece of jewelry adorns a beautiful woman." For this reason, she wanted to create a work of art that would "help the rest of the world become aware of and be sensitive to the beauty of the silversword and Haleakalā." We are excited to share The Silversword with the millions of travelers that pass through Kahului Airport every day! For more information about the Haleakalā collection, please visit our webpage at https://www.nps.gov/hale/learn/historyculture/collections.htm (REH) #airportexhibit #OGG #Haleakalāsilversword #'āhinahina #NPS #npsmuseum #haleakalācollection #HALEmuseum #halehōʻikeʻike #metalsculpture
The Himatione sanguinea, commonly known as the ‘Apapane, is an endemic species of the Hawaiian honeycreeper. Prized by Hawaiian nobility, the ‘Apapane’s crimson feathers adorned the ‘ahu‘’ula (feather capes), mahiole (helmets), kāhili (feather standard), and nā lei hulu (feather lei) of Hawaiian royals. Skilled bird catchers keen to the forests of Hawaiʻi, Maui, Oʻahu, Kauaʻi, Lānaʻi and Molokaʻi would line branches of the ʻōhiʻa lehua (Metrosideros polymorpha) with the gummy, sticky sap of the Hawaiian ʻulu (breadfruit) tree. When the ʻApapane would land on a branch to feed on the nectar of the ʻōhiʻa lehua, it would become stuck. The bird catchers would remove the bird from the branch with delicate care and proceed to remove only 1-3 feathers from the neck, wing, or tail, then release the bird back into the forest to reproduce. Over 400,000 feathers adorn the ‘ahu‘’ula of Kamehameha I. In addition, it is estimated that it took approximately 20,000 birds to produce the ‘ahu‘’ula of high chief Kalani‘’ōpu‘’u. For more information about the Haleakalā collection, please visit our webpage at https://www.nps.gov/hale/learn/historyculture/collections.htm #objectoftheweek #haleakalā #NPS #npsmuseum #haleakalācollection #HALEmuseum #halehōʻikeʻike # ‘apapane #‘amakihi
A new exhibit case has been installed at our Haleakalā Visitor Center in our summit district! Birds, plants, insects and archives are on display, telling the story of the 1967 Kīpahulu Valley Expedition and the preservation that has followed since the historic scientific expedition. If you find yourself visiting the park near the summit of Haleakalā, check out the display. The park plans to rotate these displays every three months. (REH) #HVCexhibit #haleakalā #NPS #npsmuseum #haleakalācollection #HALEmuseum #halehōʻikeʻike #KīpahuluValleyExpedition #50thAnniversary
This week the Haleakalā Museum is highlighting its ethnographic collection with an iʻe kuku or kapa beater. This four-sided wooden object is used to pound plant fiber into kapa cloth, a fabric made by Native Hawaiians. Some of the plant species used in kapa making include wauke (Broussonetia papyrifera), ʻulu (Artocarpus altilis), maʻaloa (Neraudia melastomifolia), māmaki (Pipturus albidus), ʻākala (Rubus hawaiensis), and hau (Hibiscus tiliaceus). A typical iʻe kuku, like this one pictured, is made of hard wood, and has grooves of various widths on each side. Each of these sides has its purpose in working the kapa cloth. While men typically carved the i'e kuku in ancient Hawai'i, kapa making was traditionally a woman's task. Each kapa maker has a distinct design on their iʻe kuku. This design creates a watermark on the kapa cloth which allows people to see who the kapa maker is. For more information about the Haleakalā collection, please visit our webpage at https://www.nps.gov/hale/learn/historyculture/collections.htm. (KM) #objectoftheweek #haleakalā #NPS #npsmuseum #haleakalācollection #HALEmuseum #halehōʻikeʻike #HALEethnographic #kapa #i 'ekuku
The Civilian Conservation Corps (CCC) was formed in 1933 to provide work on public land for unemployed men. The CCC was very important to the development and maintenance of the resources of the National Parks, including Haleakalā National Park. Starting in 1934, young men of the CCC hauled building supplies for the Hōlua, Kapalaoa and Palikū Cabins into the crater and built and repaired trails such as Halemau‘u trail. The cabins and trails were meant to blend into the Haleakalā wilderness, and create a minimal visual impact. To this day, visitors are enjoying the cabins and trails built by the CCC. For more information about the Haleakalā collection, please visit our webpage at https://www.nps.gov/hale/learn/historyculture/collections.htm. (KM) #objectoftheweek #haleakalā #NPS #npsmuseum #haleakalācollection #HALEmuseum #halehōʻikeʻike #HALEhistoricphotos #historicphoto #CivilianConservationCorps #CCC
Santalum haleakalae, commonly known as Haleakala sandalwood or ‘iliahi, is a rare, endemic species of sandalwood that grows only on the island of Maui. S. haleakalae is a subalpine shrubland plant that grows at 6,200 to 8,900 ft above sea level and has a distinct sweet smell when burned. This specimen was collected by Otto Degener, who was the first naturalist for Hawai‘i National Park, Haleakalā Section in the early 1920s. During the 1800s, large amounts of sandalwood were cut down from Hawaiian forests and traded to China for ritual purposes and alternative medicines. By the 1830s, the demand for the fragrant wood had resulted in the collapse of the sandalwood populations in Hawai‘i. The last remnant populations of sandalwood can be found in remote and sometimes inaccessible areas, such as Haleakalā National Park. (KM) #objectoftheweek #haleakalā #NPS #npsmuseum #haleakalācollection #HALEmuseum #halehōʻikeʻike #HALEherbarium #sandalwood #ottodegener
The Plagithmysus funebris, commonly known as the Hawaiian Plagithmysus Longhorn Beetle, is endemic to the Hawaiian Islands. The P.funebris is part of the Coleoptera (beetle) order, which is the largest of all the orders in the insect world. The P.funebris larvae bore through the wood of various native plants including koa (Acacia koa), ōhi’a(Metrosideros polymorpha) and māmane (Sophora chrysophylla). The P.funebris are a primary food for the endangered kiwikiu or Maui parrotbill (Pseudonestor xanthophrys) . For more information about the Haleakalā collection, please visit our webpage at https://www.nps.gov/hale/learn/historyculture/collections.htm. (KM) #objectoftheweek #haleakalā #NPS #npsmuseum #haleakalācollection #HALEmuseum #halehōʻikeʻike #HALEentomology
Haleakalā National Park museum collection includes a native Hawaiian ethnographic collection. Ethnography is the study of human culture. The leho he‘e (octopus lure) is a bone hook attached to a wooden shaft, cowry shell, and stone sinker. The leho he‘e was made for fishing in deeper waters and was used to catch octopus. The cowry shell for the leho he‘e was selected with great care. There are four varieties of cowry shell; and each cowry was used at different periods of the day. The ahi cowry lure was used in the morning before sunrise, the ‘olupalaha and pauhu cowry lure was used after the sun rose, and the kupa cowry lure was used towards noon. The leho he‘e pictured here was made by a Haleakalā National park ranger, and is on display at the Kīpahulu Visitor Center. For more information about the Haleakalā collection, please visit our webpage at https://www.nps.gov/hale/learn/historyculture/collections.htm. #objectoftheweek #haleakalā #NPS #npsmuseum #haleakalācollection #HALEmuseum #halehōʻikeʻike #lehohe ‘e #octopuslure
Haleakalā National Park has a wide variety of native Hawaiian birds. This week the Haleakalā museum collection is highlighting its ornithology (bird) collection with the Hawai‘i ‘amakihi (honeycreeper). There are two recognized subspecies of the Hawai‘i ‘amakihi: the C. v. wilsoni on the island of Maui and Moloka‘i, and the C. v. virens on the Big Island of Hawai‘i. The ‘amakihi has a tubular tongue, which allows for it to drink nectar from flowers like the ‘ōhi‘a lehua (Metrosideros polymorpha),ʻākala (Rubus hawaiensis), and māmane (Sophora chrysophylla). The ‘amakihi also eats spiders and insects that are in the trees and shrubs. The Hawai‘i ‘amakihi is one of the most adaptable of the Hawaiian honeycreepers, and therefore has been relatively less affected by habitat loss and avian malaria. For more information about the Haleakalā collection, please visit our webpage at https://www.nps.gov/hale/learn/historyculture/collections.htm. (KM) #objectoftheweek #haleakalā #NPS #npsmuseum #haleakalācollection #HALEmuseum #halehōʻikeʻike #Hawaiianhoneycreeper #‘amakihi
This week the Haleakalā National Park museum is highlighting its entomology (study of bugs) collection with Euodynerus sociabilis, a wasp in the family Vespidae. Euodynerus sociabilis is endemic to Hawaii and is found no where else on earth. Here at Haleakalā, Euodynerus sociabilis can be found in upper elevations and are often seen flying around silversword flowers. This species of wasp is almost completely black compared to its introduced pest relative the yellow jacket. (KM) #objectoftheweek #haleakalā #NPS #npsmuseum #haleakalācollection #HALEmuseum #halehōʻikeʻike
This week, the Haleakalā Museum highlights its ornithology (study of birds) collection with a stuffed nēnē from 1968. The endangered nēnē (pronounced nay-nay) or Hawaiian goose is the official bird of Hawai'i and is exclusively found in the wild on the islands of Hawai'i, Maui, Moloka’i and Kaua’i. In the 1950’s there were only about 30 nēnē in the wild and today the nēnē is one of the rarest geese in the world. The major cause of death in the wild for the nēnē is predation by mongooses, cats, and dogs or getting hit by cars. Today, with hard work and dedication there are an estimate of 500 nēnē on Maui with 250 living in Haleakalā National Park. To help protect the nēnē please do not feed or touch them and drive slowly within the park – there may be a nēnē on the road! (KM) #objectoftheweek #haleakala #NPS #npsmuseum #haleakalacollection #slowdownfornene #halemuseum #halehōʻikeʻike
One of my absolute favorite places. #halehōʻikeʻike
E hele mai to Hale Hōʻikeʻike at the Bailey House for the Hānau Ka Ua Book release. Get plenty of Palaoa ʻUlu - ʻUlu flour and Waikapū Poi too! #Waikapūpoi #Nohoʻanafarm #baileyhousemuseum #halehōʻikeʻike
Mai uka a i kai, me nā wahi o waena. #kākuhihewa #makapuʻu #halehōʻikeʻike #nuʻuanupali @leilanimalie