#indigenousrights

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Why Native keep their long hair has a deepen meaning than you thought⬇️ Follow @nativeamericansoul for more🌎 Comment your thoughts !!!
📷: @indigenousunited Thank you !!! * Protectors of mother earth. * Follow us @native_american_insta * Visit our shop to buy 🔝 T-SHIRTS, Hoodies, Legging, Mugs... Updating... ➡ Click the link in my bio ( @native_american_insta ) Thank you ! 💟💟💟
He tries to be human. I blow in his face. This is what we do. 🐺 ❤ 🙄 Follow 👉 Please click the link in our bio to get yours now! 👉 Tag your friends. Cre by : mynameismisty_ Follow 👉 Please click the link in our bio to get yours now! 👉 Tag your friends. Cre by : nativeprides Follow 👉 Please click the link in our bio to get yours now! 👉 Tag your friends. Cre by : nativeprides Follow 👉 Please click the link in our bio to get yours now! 👉 Tag your friends. Cre by : nativeprides Follow 👉 Please click the link in our bio to get yours now! 👉 Tag your friends. Cre by : nativeprides Follow 👉 Please click the link in our bio to get yours now! 👉 Tag your friends. Cre by : nativeprides Follow 👉 Please click the link in our bio to get yours now! 👉 Tag your friends. Cre by : nativeprides Follow 👉 Please click the link in our bio to get yours now! 👉 Tag your friends. Cre by : nativeprides Follow 👉 Please click the link in our bio to get yours now! 👉 Tag your friends. Cre by : nativeprides Follow @nativeprides 👉 Please click the link in our bio to get yours now! 👉 Tag your friends. Cre by : nativeprides #nativeamerican #native #nativepride #natives #nativeart #nativeamericans #nativeinstruments #nativeplants #nativemade #nativeamericanheritagemonth #nativeblood #nativeland #nativetexan #nativeroots #nativemen #nativeamerican #nativeamericantattoo #nativeamericanart #native #indigenousrights #nativeamericanwisdom #nativeamerica #headdress #nativeamericanmen
He tries to be human. I blow in his face. This is what we do. 🐺 ❤ 🙄 Follow 👉 Please click the link in our bio to get yours now! 👉 Tag your friends. Cre by : mynameismisty_ Follow 👉 Please click the link in our bio to get yours now! 👉 Tag your friends. Cre by : nativeprides Follow 👉 Please click the link in our bio to get yours now! 👉 Tag your friends. Cre by : nativeprides Follow 👉 Please click the link in our bio to get yours now! 👉 Tag your friends. Cre by : nativeprides Follow 👉 Please click the link in our bio to get yours now! 👉 Tag your friends. Cre by : nativeprides Follow 👉 Please click the link in our bio to get yours now! 👉 Tag your friends. Cre by : nativeprides Follow 👉 Please click the link in our bio to get yours now! 👉 Tag your friends. Cre by : nativeprides Follow 👉 Please click the link in our bio to get yours now! 👉 Tag your friends. Cre by : nativeprides Follow 👉 Please click the link in our bio to get yours now! 👉 Tag your friends. Cre by : nativeprides Follow @nativeprides 👉 Please click the link in our bio to get yours now! 👉 Tag your friends. Cre by : nativeprides #nativeamerican #native #nativepride #natives #nativeart #nativeamericans #nativeinstruments #nativeplants #nativemade #nativeamericanheritagemonth #nativeblood #nativeland #nativetexan #nativeroots #nativemen #nativeamerican #nativeamericantattoo #nativeamericanart #native #indigenousrights #nativeamericanwisdom #nativeamerica #headdress #nativeamericanmen
[The people of the Quinault Indian Nation, in western Washington State, have harvested an abundance of bluebacks, a flavorful and fatty salmon that's been unique to their tribe for thousands of years.  # Years ago, the Quinault, scrupulous about keeping oral historical records, realized their blueback harvest had started to decline. The likely culprit: widespread logging, which denuded forestlands and sent torrents of water through the watershed, washing away the channels on the Quinault River, home to the bluebacks. # The Quinault, together with federal agencies including the National Oceanic and Atmospheric Administration, Fish and Wildlife Service, and National Park Service, are restoring the river—and the Quinault's long-term ecological knowledge of river patterns is providing vital data to the recovery project. # But Native Americans are also wary of disclosing traditional knowledge, because doing so risks opening a door to exploitation that can undermine tribal values, harm their resources, or fail to provide benefits in return, says Preston Hardison, a policy analyst in the Tulalip Tribes Department of Natural Resources, which oversees traditional knowledge guidelines in western Washington. # Put simply, traditional knowledge is the accumulation of observations of the landscape and local resources passed down through generations. # Recent history suggests those fears are merited. When botanists from the United States Department of Agriculture discovered in 1962 that tribes in the Pacific Northwest used the Pacific yew tree to treat a variety of ailments, including cancer, they released studies about a chemical they found in its bark, called paclitaxel, that stopped cancerous tumors from developing. # The conifer quickly fell victim to overexploitation by pharmaceutical interests.] ■ #awareness #humanrights #indigenousfood #indigenousrights #Indigenous #firstnations #tulalip #seattle #washingtonstate #vancouver #britishcolumbia #salmon #environment #sustainability #tradition #culture #government #bigpharma #corruption #greed #wayoflife #ancient #respect #unitednations #native #traditional #decolonize
How great it was to see the final product of our film “Trouble in the Garden” screened for the first time yesterday at @cinefestsudbury International Film Festival! Director and writer Roz Owen has captured an incredibly important tale, based on the many whose lives have been affected by the tragic Sixties Scoop. It was an honour to work on this project with such a strong cast and crew, including @jon_cor , @kelly.vanderburg , DOP @michael.j.caterina , @jtmesich , @jennyfrommclauch , @crossfaded , @tanbrazi , and all the rest who go by insane aliases and therefore I cannot find. Hopefully this film will generate discussion and awareness necessary to move forward. Keep an eye out for a screening near you! Now here are some behind the scenes shenanigans, and a lovely screen still to cover them. #troubleinthegarden #drama #independentfilm #indigenousrights
📷: @indigenouscultures 💕 thanks to the photographer 🏆! 😃 * Who out there loves wolves? ✊ * Follow me @native_american_xtop for more! * For great stuff check Link in bio 👉 @native_american_xtop Thank you ! 💟💟💟
📷: @nativeamerican_500tribe Thank you !!! * ?Please_do * Follow me @native_american_ofgram for more! * For great stuff check Link in bio 👉 @native_american_ofgram Thank you ! 💟💟💟
Credit to @stevenpauljudd thanks to the photographer * Today I start gluing all 950 cubes. 24hr drying time for each section. @thegorillagluecompany * Please follow me 🙏🏻 : @native_american_insta * 🔴 If you want t-shirts or hoodie , please check the link in our bio (profile)➡ @native_american_insta Thank you ! 💟💟💟
💕#via : @redcrookedsky 💕 thanks to the photographer 🏆! 😃 * We are excited to announced that @RedCrookedSky will be dancing @ko_ndnbxr into the arena at @MoheganSun tomorrow night! She is a powerful, precedent setting athlete and we are honored to be here with her! Show her some love and follow up to see us LIVE!! @NESN * Follow us @native_american_daily_zz * Visit our shop to buy 🔝 T-SHIRTS, Hoodies, Legging, Mugs... Updating... ➡ Click the link in my bio ( @native_american_daily_zz ) Thank you ! 💟💟💟
"September 8th, 2018 marks an important point in history for the Gigal’gam Namima of the Ligwildawx People. For the first time in 100 years we honoured one of our babies with the Hilugwila ceremony. It was also the first time in 100 years we gathered as a Namima in the Gukzdi. It was beautiful to see how our family came together to reclaim the ancient ceremony. Cheif padziyus “high spring or high water” was our last Gigal’gam ancestor to potlatch. That was in 1913. In 1922, Padziyus was a part of Dan Cranmer’s Potlatch. From there he was arrested and All of our masks and regalia were seized and now live in the Umista cultural centre and the museum in Cape Mudge. This is a direct result of the potlatch ban: oppressive colonial legislation that criminalized our ceremonies and intended to wipe out our culture. It has taken a century for our family to start to heal the cultural loss our Namima has endured as a result of colonization, but that healing has begun. It begun in 2010 when we had our first feast, and it continues today. Exercising our rights as Bakwam people is how we can heal from the cultural and spiritual loss we experienced. K’yuusda is the first generation in the past 100 years to be given culture as a foundation for her life. She is paving the way for the next generations to not have to grow up disconnected from their culture. She is paving the way for our children to have a positive connection to their Ligwildawx identity. She was given the name Ninoksala “Wise One”, a name that was passed down to her from her Great Aunty, Juanita Johnston. This name has been passed down in our Namima for many generations Gilakasla to all of those who came to witness Gilakasla to the guardians, Matriarchs, Cheif’s, singers, attendants and cooks for making it possible for this important ceremony to happen. And a huge Gilakasla to James for hosting this ceremony for our family." -Nalaga Avis O'Brien
"September 8th, 2018 marks an important point in history for the Gigal’gam Namima of the Ligwildawx People. For the first time in 100 years we honoured one of our babies with the Hilugwila ceremony. It was also the first time in 100 years we gathered as a Namima in the Gukzdi. It was beautiful to see how our family came together to reclaim the ancient ceremony. Cheif padziyus “high spring or high water” was our last Gigal’gam ancestor to potlatch. That was in 1913. In 1922, Padziyus was a part of Dan Cranmer’s Potlatch. From there he was arrested and All of our masks and regalia were seized and now live in the Umista cultural centre and the museum in Cape Mudge. This is a direct result of the potlatch ban: oppressive colonial legislation that criminalized our ceremonies and intended to wipe out our culture. It has taken a century for our family to start to heal the cultural loss our Namima has endured as a result of colonization, but that healing has begun. It begun in 2010 when we had our first feast, and it continues today. Exercising our rights as Bakwam people is how we can heal from the cultural and spiritual loss we experienced. K’yuusda is the first generation in the past 100 years to be given culture as a foundation for her life. She is paving the way for the next generations to not have to grow up disconnected from their culture. She is paving the way for our children to have a positive connection to their Ligwildawx identity. She was given the name Ninoksala “Wise One”, a name that was passed down to her from her Great Aunty, Juanita Johnston. This name has been passed down in our Namima for many generations Gilakasla to all of those who came to witness Gilakasla to the guardians, Matriarchs, Cheif’s, singers, attendants and cooks for making it possible for this important ceremony to happen. And a huge Gilakasla to James for hosting this ceremony for our family." -Nalaga Avis O'Brien
"September 8th, 2018 marks an important point in history for the Gigal’gam Namima of the Ligwildawx People. For the first time in 100 years we honoured one of our babies with the Hilugwila ceremony. It was also the first time in 100 years we gathered as a Namima in the Gukzdi. It was beautiful to see how our family came together to reclaim the ancient ceremony. Cheif padziyus “high spring or high water” was our last Gigal’gam ancestor to potlatch. That was in 1913. In 1922, Padziyus was a part of Dan Cranmer’s Potlatch. From there he was arrested and All of our masks and regalia were seized and now live in the Umista cultural centre and the museum in Cape Mudge. This is a direct result of the potlatch ban: oppressive colonial legislation that criminalized our ceremonies and intended to wipe out our culture. It has taken a century for our family to start to heal the cultural loss our Namima has endured as a result of colonization, but that healing has begun. It begun in 2010 when we had our first feast, and it continues today. Exercising our rights as Bakwam people is how we can heal from the cultural and spiritual loss we experienced. K’yuusda is the first generation in the past 100 years to be given culture as a foundation for her life. She is paving the way for the next generations to not have to grow up disconnected from their culture. She is paving the way for our children to have a positive connection to their Ligwildawx identity. She was given the name Ninoksala “Wise One”, a name that was passed down to her from her Great Aunty, Juanita Johnston. This name has been passed down in our Namima for many generations Gilakasla to all of those who came to witness Gilakasla to the guardians, Matriarchs, Cheif’s, singers, attendants and cooks for making it possible for this important ceremony to happen. And a huge Gilakasla to James for hosting this ceremony for our family." -Nalaga Avis O'Brien
"September 8th, 2018 marks an important point in history for the Gigal’gam Namima of the Ligwildawx People. For the first time in 100 years we honoured one of our babies with the Hilugwila ceremony. It was also the first time in 100 years we gathered as a Namima in the Gukzdi. It was beautiful to see how our family came together to reclaim the ancient ceremony. Cheif padziyus “high spring or high water” was our last Gigal’gam ancestor to potlatch. That was in 1913. In 1922, Padziyus was a part of Dan Cranmer’s Potlatch. From there he was arrested and All of our masks and regalia were seized and now live in the Umista cultural centre and the museum in Cape Mudge. This is a direct result of the potlatch ban: oppressive colonial legislation that criminalized our ceremonies and intended to wipe out our culture. It has taken a century for our family to start to heal the cultural loss our Namima has endured as a result of colonization, but that healing has begun. It begun in 2010 when we had our first feast, and it continues today. Exercising our rights as Bakwam people is how we can heal from the cultural and spiritual loss we experienced. K’yuusda is the first generation in the past 100 years to be given culture as a foundation for her life. She is paving the way for the next generations to not have to grow up disconnected from their culture. She is paving the way for our children to have a positive connection to their Ligwildawx identity. She was given the name Ninoksala “Wise One”, a name that was passed down to her from her Great Aunty, Juanita Johnston. This name has been passed down in our Namima for many generations Gilakasla to all of those who came to witness Gilakasla to the guardians, Matriarchs, Cheif’s, singers, attendants and cooks for making it possible for this important ceremony to happen. And a huge Gilakasla to James for hosting this ceremony for our family." -Nalaga Avis O'Brien
"September 8th, 2018 marks an important point in history for the Gigal’gam Namima of the Ligwildawx People. For the first time in 100 years we honoured one of our babies with the Hilugwila ceremony. It was also the first time in 100 years we gathered as a Namima in the Gukzdi. It was beautiful to see how our family came together to reclaim the ancient ceremony. Cheif padziyus “high spring or high water” was our last Gigal’gam ancestor to potlatch. That was in 1913. In 1922, Padziyus was a part of Dan Cranmer’s Potlatch. From there he was arrested and All of our masks and regalia were seized and now live in the Umista cultural centre and the museum in Cape Mudge. This is a direct result of the potlatch ban: oppressive colonial legislation that criminalized our ceremonies and intended to wipe out our culture. It has taken a century for our family to start to heal the cultural loss our Namima has endured as a result of colonization, but that healing has begun. It begun in 2010 when we had our first feast, and it continues today. Exercising our rights as Bakwam people is how we can heal from the cultural and spiritual loss we experienced. K’yuusda is the first generation in the past 100 years to be given culture as a foundation for her life. She is paving the way for the next generations to not have to grow up disconnected from their culture. She is paving the way for our children to have a positive connection to their Ligwildawx identity. She was given the name Ninoksala “Wise One”, a name that was passed down to her from her Great Aunty, Juanita Johnston. This name has been passed down in our Namima for many generations Gilakasla to all of those who came to witness Gilakasla to the guardians, Matriarchs, Cheif’s, singers, attendants and cooks for making it possible for this important ceremony to happen. And a huge Gilakasla to James for hosting this ceremony for our family." -Nalaga Avis O'Brien
"September 8th, 2018 marks an important point in history for the Gigal’gam Namima of the Ligwildawx People. For the first time in 100 years we honoured one of our babies with the Hilugwila ceremony. It was also the first time in 100 years we gathered as a Namima in the Gukzdi. It was beautiful to see how our family came together to reclaim the ancient ceremony. Cheif padziyus “high spring or high water” was our last Gigal’gam ancestor to potlatch. That was in 1913. In 1922, Padziyus was a part of Dan Cranmer’s Potlatch. From there he was arrested and All of our masks and regalia were seized and now live in the Umista cultural centre and the museum in Cape Mudge. This is a direct result of the potlatch ban: oppressive colonial legislation that criminalized our ceremonies and intended to wipe out our culture. It has taken a century for our family to start to heal the cultural loss our Namima has endured as a result of colonization, but that healing has begun. It begun in 2010 when we had our first feast, and it continues today. Exercising our rights as Bakwam people is how we can heal from the cultural and spiritual loss we experienced. K’yuusda is the first generation in the past 100 years to be given culture as a foundation for her life. She is paving the way for the next generations to not have to grow up disconnected from their culture. She is paving the way for our children to have a positive connection to their Ligwildawx identity. She was given the name Ninoksala “Wise One”, a name that was passed down to her from her Great Aunty, Juanita Johnston. This name has been passed down in our Namima for many generations Gilakasla to all of those who came to witness Gilakasla to the guardians, Matriarchs, Cheif’s, singers, attendants and cooks for making it possible for this important ceremony to happen. And a huge Gilakasla to James for hosting this ceremony for our family." -Nalaga Avis O'Brien
"September 8th, 2018 marks an important point in history for the Gigal’gam Namima of the Ligwildawx People. For the first time in 100 years we honoured one of our babies with the Hilugwila ceremony. It was also the first time in 100 years we gathered as a Namima in the Gukzdi. It was beautiful to see how our family came together to reclaim the ancient ceremony. Cheif padziyus “high spring or high water” was our last Gigal’gam ancestor to potlatch. That was in 1913. In 1922, Padziyus was a part of Dan Cranmer’s Potlatch. From there he was arrested and All of our masks and regalia were seized and now live in the Umista cultural centre and the museum in Cape Mudge. This is a direct result of the potlatch ban: oppressive colonial legislation that criminalized our ceremonies and intended to wipe out our culture. It has taken a century for our family to start to heal the cultural loss our Namima has endured as a result of colonization, but that healing has begun. It begun in 2010 when we had our first feast, and it continues today. Exercising our rights as Bakwam people is how we can heal from the cultural and spiritual loss we experienced. K’yuusda is the first generation in the past 100 years to be given culture as a foundation for her life. She is paving the way for the next generations to not have to grow up disconnected from their culture. She is paving the way for our children to have a positive connection to their Ligwildawx identity. She was given the name Ninoksala “Wise One”, a name that was passed down to her from her Great Aunty, Juanita Johnston. This name has been passed down in our Namima for many generations Gilakasla to all of those who came to witness Gilakasla to the guardians, Matriarchs, Cheif’s, singers, attendants and cooks for making it possible for this important ceremony to happen. And a huge Gilakasla to James for hosting this ceremony for our family." -Nalaga Avis O'Brien
"September 8th, 2018 marks an important point in history for the Gigal’gam Namima of the Ligwildawx People. For the first time in 100 years we honoured one of our babies with the Hilugwila ceremony. It was also the first time in 100 years we gathered as a Namima in the Gukzdi. It was beautiful to see how our family came together to reclaim the ancient ceremony. Cheif padziyus “high spring or high water” was our last Gigal’gam ancestor to potlatch. That was in 1913. In 1922, Padziyus was a part of Dan Cranmer’s Potlatch. From there he was arrested and All of our masks and regalia were seized and now live in the Umista cultural centre and the museum in Cape Mudge. This is a direct result of the potlatch ban: oppressive colonial legislation that criminalized our ceremonies and intended to wipe out our culture. It has taken a century for our family to start to heal the cultural loss our Namima has endured as a result of colonization, but that healing has begun. It begun in 2010 when we had our first feast, and it continues today. Exercising our rights as Bakwam people is how we can heal from the cultural and spiritual loss we experienced. K’yuusda is the first generation in the past 100 years to be given culture as a foundation for her life. She is paving the way for the next generations to not have to grow up disconnected from their culture. She is paving the way for our children to have a positive connection to their Ligwildawx identity. She was given the name Ninoksala “Wise One”, a name that was passed down to her from her Great Aunty, Juanita Johnston. This name has been passed down in our Namima for many generations Gilakasla to all of those who came to witness Gilakasla to the guardians, Matriarchs, Cheif’s, singers, attendants and cooks for making it possible for this important ceremony to happen. And a huge Gilakasla to James for hosting this ceremony for our family." -Nalaga Avis O'Brien
"September 8th, 2018 marks an important point in history for the Gigal’gam Namima of the Ligwildawx People. For the first time in 100 years we honoured one of our babies with the Hilugwila ceremony. It was also the first time in 100 years we gathered as a Namima in the Gukzdi. It was beautiful to see how our family came together to reclaim the ancient ceremony. Cheif padziyus “high spring or high water” was our last Gigal’gam ancestor to potlatch. That was in 1913. In 1922, Padziyus was a part of Dan Cranmer’s Potlatch. From there he was arrested and All of our masks and regalia were seized and now live in the Umista cultural centre and the museum in Cape Mudge. This is a direct result of the potlatch ban: oppressive colonial legislation that criminalized our ceremonies and intended to wipe out our culture. It has taken a century for our family to start to heal the cultural loss our Namima has endured as a result of colonization, but that healing has begun. It begun in 2010 when we had our first feast, and it continues today. Exercising our rights as Bakwam people is how we can heal from the cultural and spiritual loss we experienced. K’yuusda is the first generation in the past 100 years to be given culture as a foundation for her life. She is paving the way for the next generations to not have to grow up disconnected from their culture. She is paving the way for our children to have a positive connection to their Ligwildawx identity. She was given the name Ninoksala “Wise One”, a name that was passed down to her from her Great Aunty, Juanita Johnston. This name has been passed down in our Namima for many generations Gilakasla to all of those who came to witness Gilakasla to the guardians, Matriarchs, Cheif’s, singers, attendants and cooks for making it possible for this important ceremony to happen. And a huge Gilakasla to James for hosting this ceremony for our family." -Nalaga Avis O'Brien
Papua New Guinea: Eastern Highlands — Indigenous people see the physical world as a reflection of a more complex, subtler, and more lasting, yet invisible entity called energy. It is as if they are the shadows of a vibrant and endlessly resourceful intelligence, dynamically involved in a process of continuous self-creation. In allowing ourselves a narrow horizon of vision, we tend to believe only what our eyes see, what us palpable. But the narrower our perception is and the less space we allow for dynamic life processes to occur, the less accessible the spirit is. Having that inner energy and spirit is what drives us and gives us purpose for living — #sacredecology #indigenousrights #filmmaking #conservation #ethnosphere #papuanewguinea
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