antiqueweapons

Antique Weapons

Sharing a passion for the rich and fascinating history of weapons throughout the ages. Here to inform and hopefully inspire!

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Sorry it's been so long, I'm going to be making a real effort to bring you regular instalments of #AntiqueWeapons going forward! Thank you all for your incredible support of my page and your interest in this fascinating field. . Previously featured, this is a detailed shot of the famed 'Roi De Rome' pistols by Le Page, celebrated gunsmith to King Louis XVI, Emperor Napoleon and King Louis XVIII. . Dated January 1814, their genesis coincides with Napoleon’s final meeting with his son. The incredible quality of the pistols, encrusted and inlaid with gold, together with their symbolism and dating, marks them out as an important imperial gift. They were most likely commissioned to celebrate L’Aiglon’s third birthday on 20 March 1814, but, due to the invasion of France in the closing days of 1813, are more likely to have become a poignant leaving present from a father to his son. . Each gun is signed: Le Page à Paris / Arq.er de L’Empereur, inscribed: LE PAGE, respectively numbered 1 and 2, inscribed with the serial number: 1703 and dated: Jan 1814.
A Mughal jade hilted dagger and scabbard from North India, dated circa 18th century. The hilt is shaped to a pistol grip and carved from pale jade, featuring a tight loop ring above upturned quillions. The double-edged steel blade is gently curved and features a central ridge with gold overlaid designs near the top. This piece is seen with its original wooden scabbard, covered with red cloth and silver mounts engraved with floral motifs.
A pair of continental percussion rifled target pistols, signed F. Marquis Bte. à Paris,circa 1855-60 Both guns feature blued octagonal sighted barrels boldly cut with panels of scrollwork and leaves picked-out in gold at the breech and muzzle. These barrels are cut with a design of alternating wide and narrow fluting encrusted with gold lines and pellets. The barrels also feature twelve groove rifling, case-hardened breeches and Liège proof marks. The case-hardened locks are engraved with leafy ribband scrollwork on a matted ground and signed in gold. The half stocks are ebony and feature neo-rococo patterns heavily carved in the fore ends and butts. The pair are complete in their original fitted case, veneered in rosewood and lined in royal blue velvet. The lid (unpictured) is signed in gilt-stamped letters 'Francis Marquis Breveté, 4 Bould. des Italiens, Paris', and retaining its full original selection of accessories. French, circa 1855-60.
A cased pair of fully stocked officers percussion pistols, fitted with swivel ram rods in their green felt lined case. . Various accessories include bullet mould, screwdriver, cap tin, power flask, oil bottle and spare lead balls. These pistols were typically used my a military officer or for a traveller. English circa 1830
A cased pair of Westley Richards single shot percussion pistols. The pistols feature intricately carved 3/4 stocks with traditionally chequered butts and metal butt plates. The action is engraved with a traditional English rose & scroll pattern and the pair are cased in their green felt lined box equipped with bullet mould, powder flask and tooling.
A high quality example of a French flintlock pistol from the late 18th century. Manufactured by the gunmaker of Peniet, of Paris. The quality of this pistol is demonstrated by the elaborate silver and gold decorative inlay, made in the style of the famed gunsmith Boutet of Versailles. This pistol is seen with all its original fittings, and would have belonged to an officer or a gentleman for the purpose of duelling or defence
A fine Arabic Jambiya dagger from Yemin. The handle is crafted from a solid piece of walrus ivory, and the silver scabbard is pierced and chased in a decorative fashion. The typical shaped wide blade of Yeminite style daggers like this example is made of plain steel. A very unique characteristic of the blade however is that it has gilded inscriptions on the obverse side of the blade, on both sides of the midrib. The majority of Arab Jambiyas used rhinoceros horn, horn or giraffe hoof for the hilts, rarely walrus ivory as in the case of this presented dagger. One advantage of this ivory in comparison to elephant ivory for these weapons was that it did not splinter. Walrus ivory was much more widely used in Persia and India for dagger and sword hilts. . This piece is part of the Streshinskiy Collection, kindly submitted by @dimitry_666
A cased 120-bore superimposed load, percussion pepperbox revolver by manufacturer Le Page Arq.er Du Roi, of Paris. This is an extremely rare example, capable of firing 12 shots from its 6 cylindrical barrels. . The gun features a browned (not blued!) cluster of six rifled cylindrical barrels, each made to accommodate two charges which are numbered consecutively in gold on the short ribs between the breeches. Each barrel is fitted with a pair of nipples at the rear for the percussion caps. The hammer is concealed within the design and blued for decoration. The action is also enclosed, whilst the case-hardened top and bottom straps are each finely engraved with hatched foliated scrollwork, the former signed in Gothic script. . The carved, fluted butt is crafted from ebony to again distinguish this piece from other guns of the time, whilst the case-hardened ring-trigger is engraved. . As seen, the gun is in it's original ebonised fitted case lined in green velvet, complete with a full host of accessories including a signed Le Page copper and brass powder-flask and two brass chargers, respectively for powder and balls. The outside of the case is inlaid with brass stringing for decoration and features a shaped central escutcheon in the lid. French, circa 1840
An extremely rare 100 bore, 6 barrel, percussion box-lock pistol from Ireland. The makers name is signed Wm. & Jno. Rigby, Dublin. The gun features screw turn barrels, which are numbered from 1- 6. The primary barrel is engraved with foliage along the top, whilst the breeches also feature foliate engraving numbered correspondingly. The rounded walnut butt is chequered and this gun also features a folding trigger, meaning that the trigger drops down once the hammer is cocked. Irish, circa 1829
A very early Katar knife from Tanjore, inlaid with silver. Indian circa 1650
A beautiful double-barrelled flintlock pocket pistol, with full stock and double trigger. Each barrel would be shot from a different trigger. The barrels are decorated with gold etching, whilst the stock and grip is inlaid with silver wire designs. Italian, Torino circa the last quarter of the 18th Century
A very decorative Mughal koftgari steel dagger (peshkabz) with a gem-set jade hilt. The dagger features a slightly curved steel blade with flattened spine. The forte is engraved with a fragmentary pole-medallion containing scrolling floral and foliate interlace, whilst the blade is inlaid with gold. The jade hilt is inlaid with rubies and emeralds mounted in gold mounts, styled in the form of flowerheads. At the end of the hilt (unseen) are six rosettes. Northern India, circa 19th Century
Another shot of the magnificent Roi De Rome pistols by Le Page, celebrated gunsmith to King Louis XVI, Emperor Napoleon and King Louis XVIII. . Photo illustrates the original thuya wood presentation case with fine ivory tooling. . For the full description please see my previous image.
Now for something REALLY special: The Roi De Rome Pistols. These superb pistols were made by Jean Le Page, celebrated gunsmith to King Louis XVI, Emperor Napoleon I, and King Louis XVIII. They are adorned with Napoleonic imperial symbolism, including the Emperor’s personal cipher, the capitalised N; the imperial eagle; the thunderbolt; and the bee. Significantly, they are inlaid in gold with the Italian Iron Crown of the Order of the Iron Crown, of which the Roi de Rome was proclaimed a Grand Cross Knight at his birth. . Dated January 1814, their genesis coincides with Napoleon’s final meeting with his son. The incredible quality of the pistols, encrusted and inlaid with gold, together with their symbolism and dating, marks them out as an important imperial gift. They were most likely commissioned to celebrate L’Aiglon’s third birthday on 20 March 1814, but, due to the invasion of France in the closing days of 1813, are more likely to have become a poignant leaving present from a father to his son. . The pistols are of a bespoke third size for a young boy’s hands, and are complete with their original thuya wood presentation case. Centered on the lid of this box is a mother of pearl inlaid roundel engraved with a scene after Jean-Baptiste Regnault of the young Achilles being taught archery by the centaur Chiron, underlining the purpose of the pistols as the young king’s first set of guns. . Each gun is signed: Le Page à Paris / Arq.er de L’Empereur, inscribed: LE PAGE, respectively numbered 1 and 2, inscribed with the serial number: 1703 and dated: Janv. 1814.
A decorative diplomat's sword with leather scabbard. French, 19th century
A presentation edition engraved Springfield Arms percussion Naval revolver. Former property of Capt. James E. Luce, captain of various transatlantic steamships in the mid 19th century. American, circa 1851
A truly special piece, this highly decorative dagger and scabbard is thought to have been commissioned and designed by Emperor Jahangir around 1619. A masterpiece of 1,685 rubies, 271 unpolished diamonds, 62 emeralds, 321 pieces of transparent emerald-green glass, 39 pieces of blue glass, 9 pieces of ivory and 6 layered agates – making a total of 2,393 stones, plus another 26 which are now missing. It is elegantly set with rubies to form patterns of birds and flowers. India, Mughal. Circa 1615-1620
A Turkish flintlock blunderbuss pistol from the Ottoman empire, featuring a flared muzzle and ornate silver wire overlaid floral design typical of Balkan Ottoman decoration. The stock is also carved in a decorative fashion. Turkey, Circa 19th Century.
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