glaciernps

Glacier National Park

Crown of the Continent

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Fall colors are appearing in Glacier! But how does it work? πŸ‚ Chlorophyll pigments capture energy from the sun and use it to turn carbon dioxide and water into sugars to grow. This is photosynthesis, you've probably heard of it. Less known is that green chlorophyll covers up other pigments already in the leaves. As the days grow shorter and temperatures drop, trees gradually shut the veins that transport fluids into the leaves, stopping chlorophyll production and revealing the vibrant fall colors we all love. πŸ‚ What's your favorite place to leaf peep? Image: Yellow leaves hang from a tree in the sun.
Going-to-the-Sun Road between Apgar and Logan Pass has reopened! πŸš—πŸŒ„ It is now possible to drive the entire length of the road. Drivers are not allowed to stop between Lake McDonald Lodge and Avalanche Creek. Winter conditions can blow in without notice and wildlife are all very active so drive with caution! Image: Cars drive on a mountain road at sunset.
Earlier this summer, the tour boat Morning Eagle was added to the National Register of Historic Places. Originally named Big Chief, she was built in 1945 and first placed on Swiftcurrent Lake in Many Glacier. By 1961, she had been transferred to nearby Lake Josephine and given the name Morning Eagle. The boat is a 45-foot long by 12-foot wide carvel planked cedar on oak frame vessel and has the capacity to carry 49 passengers. In the fall of 1974, the boat was removed from the park for repairs, but it returned in spring 1975 and has stayed on Lake Josephine ever since, spending winters in a boathouse along the shore. The Morning Eagle joins three other boats in Glacier that were added to the National Register earlier this year: the DeSmet on Lake McDonald, the Little Chief on St. Mary Lake, and the Sinopah on Two Medicine Lake. All four of the boats are owned and operated by the Glacier Park Boat Company. #ThrowbackThursday This photo was taken in June of this year and shows Morning Eagle on Lake Josephine with Mt. Gould in the distance.
β€œβ€¦and all at once, summer collapsed into fall.” – Oscar Wilde πŸ‚ There will be no running water available at Logan Pass after September 9th. πŸ’¦ Be prepared and plan ahead. Fill your water bottles before heading up Going-to-the-Sun Road. With the changing season expect changing weather conditions at any time. Image: Pink sky over blue mountains reflected in an alpine pond surrounded by trees.
That little dot is a wild grizzly bear! 🐻You really don't want to get much closer than this to a bear for your own safety but also because Glacier is working to keep these animals wild for future generations of visitors. A pair of binoculars can give you a satisfying look at wildlife without disrupting their natural behaviors. Do you carry binoculars when you hike? What about bear spray? Try the "thumb rule" to determine an appropriate distance. πŸ‘Hold your hand straight out in front of you with your thumb up, like a hitchhiker. If your thumb does not completely cover the wildlife you are observing then you need to move farther away. This rule of thumb (pun intended) allows you to get closer to smaller critters like squirrels and marmots than larger ones like bighorn sheep and mountain goats who need more space. If an animal is ever in distress, aggressive, or changing their behavior in anyway because of you, then you need to give it more space. Results may vary and the regulation is always 100 yards from bears and wolves and 25 yards from other wildlife. Image: Two people share binoculars to look at a distant bear in the mountains.
#Repost - image and text by @peterphotogram ... I mentioned how sometimes there can be temporary section closures - well this photo is along the High Line Trail. You will encounter many signs saying that certain sections are closed too off trail travel. Usually it’s due to vegetation damage or the National Park Service is trying to repair something. Please always follow the rules and don’t be like this fellow shown here who is clearly off trail πŸ™ˆ (Gracie @barkrangernps where are you? the mountain πŸ‘ are causing trouble again!!!☺️) #glaciernationalpark #glaciernps #ProtectGlacier #thehighlinetrail
On June 26-29, 1960, the Many Glacier Hotel hosted the 52nd annual Governors’ Conference. Except for those from Pennsylvania and Hawaii, all US governors attended, including those from Guam, Puerto Rico, American Samoa, and the Virgin Islands. The hotel had to install special telephone facilities in the lobby for use by the 73 news agencies and representatives covering the conference. The principal speaker at the State Dinner on June 27th was John G. Diefenbaker, the prime minister of Canada. During their stay in the park, General Motors supplied the visitors with 60 white Cadillacs and 140 Chevrolets, as seen here in this photo. #ThrowbackThursday
"...wild flowers should be enjoyed unplucked where they grow." - Theodore Roosevelt Image: A bouquet of pink Lewis' Monkeyflower (Mimulus lewisii) at Logan Pass with Reynolds Peak in the background. #WildflowerWednesday
"It's just a pretty flower, what's the harm?" How do you feel about invasive species? Yellow Toadflax, also known as butter and eggs, was introduced from Eurasia in the 1800s as an ornamental, fabric dye, and folk remedy. Today it competes with native plants throughout Glacier National Park. Without the natural limitations of their original environment, exotic plants like toadflax, can take over an area, leaving no room for native wildflowers. What are the ways weeds are accidentally brought into the park? #Nonnative #WildlflowerWednesday #Invasive
How do you feel about cairns? Remember Leave No Trace Principals six and seven: Respect Wildlife 🐻 and Be Considerate of Other VisitorsπŸƒβ€β™€οΈ Stacking rocks can have negative impacts on the natural environment. Removal of rocks from waterways can displace aquatic life, like mayflies and stoneflies, and result in increased erosion. β›° Cairn construction can also be a safety concern. Tall cairns may accidentally get toppled and could result in injuries. β›° Abundant or randomly placed cairns may cause confusion, as they are used to mark routes. Lastly, rock cairns can take away the wilderness character of a place, making it feel less wild. Repost πŸ“Έ from @kksnide - thanks for the great video!πŸ™
You've likely been seeing a lot of news coverage lately about smoke. Air quality questions are some of our top inquiries right now at the park. One of your best sources for information is the park's webcams. Sometimes smoke can settle in for multiple days, and sometimes it can be gone in a matter of hours. Additionally, the park is over one million acres, so smoke in one area may not necessarily mean smoke in another (though sometimes it is truly regional) - the webcams can help you assess. The smoke we see around the park today is made of many different solid and liquid particulates, but mostly carbon dioxide and water vapor. Most of the particulates in wildfire smoke are too small to be seen, less than 7 micrometers. In fact, 80 to 90% of the mass of wildfire smoke comes from particulates smaller than 2.5 micrometers. These fine particulates (as well as the presence of carbon monoxide) are what make exposure to smoke unhealthy for humans. #ScienceFriday #HoweRidgeFire Image: A timelapse of a smoke plume moving through the sky as the colors of sunset fade.
What behaviors do you look for to see if an animal is trying to cross the trail? Throughout the park you may encounter wildlife that wants to use the trail. For your safety and theirs, always yield the trail to wildlife. 🐏 πŸ‘ Try the "thumb rule" to determine an appropriate distance. Hold your hand straight out in front of you with your thumb up, like a hitchhiker. If your thumb does not completely cover the wildlife you are observing then you need to move farther away. This rule of thumb (pun intended) allows you to get closer to smaller critters like squirrels and marmots than larger ones like bighorn sheep and mountain goats who need more space. If an animal is ever in distress, aggressive, or changing their behavior in anyway because of you, then you need to give them more space. Results may vary and the regulation is always 25 yards from most wildlife and 100 yards from bears and wolves.
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