haleakalanps

Haleakalā National Park

The official Instagram for Haleakalā National Park.

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Can you imagine a time without cellphones when communication required lugging around bulky equipment? Many military professionals dealt with this issue in the early-mid 1900s. Pictured is a portable army field phone. These military phones were used from World War II up until the Vietnam War and are powered by D batteries. The field phone pictured is housed in a leather bag that reads “signal Corps U.S. Army Telephone EE-8-B.” Later field phones were housed in canvas instead of leather due to canvas faring better in the humid pacific climate. This phone, found in the park, was likely left behind by the military during their occupation of the park from 1941-1946. For more information about the Haleakalā collection, please visit our webpage at https://www.nps.gov/hale/learn/historyculture/collections.htm. (KEM)
Take an #ArchivesRoadTrip today to @haleakalanps , you most likely won't run into a traffic jam like this one! Opening day of the road in February, 1935 caused the traffic jam pictured here. We're happy to participate in the #ArchivesHashtagParty with the @usnatarchives photo credit: Haleakala Archives (REH)
For all of our plant enthusiasts, it’s your last to chance to see our exhibit “Following in the Botanist’s Footsteps: Botany of Haleakalā National Park from past to present,” on display at the Haleakalā Visitor Center through mid-June. This exhibit explores the history of botanists at the park, focusing on the rare plants that live in the bogs atop Haleakalā. In mid-June we will install our next exhibit “Bring the World to Maui: The History of the Park Road.” The exhibit looks at the historic highway through Haleakalā National Park, the only route to the summit that has allowed visitors to ascend Haleakalā by car since the 1930’s. This exhibit will explore the history of the park road envisioned by the Maui community and designed by the National Park Service. Come drive the road to the summit and check out the exhibit! Image one: Exhibit promo for “Following in the Botanist’s Footsteps: Botany of Haleakalā National Park from past to present.” Image two: (top-right) 1935 program for the Haleakala Road opening, Haleakalā Archives; (bottom left) Man on the back of a truck oiling the road, Haleakalā Archives; (bottom middle) Title page of 1935 Maui News “Haleakala Souvenir Edition”, Maui News; (bottom right) 1935 Photo of left to right Edward Wingate (Park Superintendent), Worth Aiken (Maui kama'aina and advocate for the road), and Arthur Green (Secretary of the Territory), Haleakalā Archives.
Anomalochrysa maclachlani or commonly known as green lacewing is an endemic species to Hawai‘i. This green winged bug is a part of the Neuroptera order or net-winged insects, which consists of some 6,000 species. In 1884,Thomas Blackburn, an English-born Australian entomologist (a person that studies insects), first described A. maclachlani. In 1876, Blackburn came to the Hawaiian Islands, where he served as senior priest and chaplain to the bishop of the Church of Hawai‘i in Honolulu. During his time there he collected insects. For more information about the Haleakalā collection, please visit our webpage at https://www.nps.gov/hale/learn/historyculture/collections.htm. (KEM) Photo Description: close up view of Anomalochrysa maclachlani. #haleakala #halemuseum #mauibugs #museumcollections #naturalhistory #haleakalācollection
Haleakalā is a massive shield volcano that forms more than 75% of the Hawaiian Island of Maui. Pictured is a volcanic bomb that was produced by the volcano when it ejected a fragment of lava through the air, which cooled before it hit the ground. This volcano bomb is what you call a spindle or almond bomb and is created when hot lava is spinning through the air and cooling, creating an elongated or almond shaped rock. Volcanic bombs can vary in size from a rock that fits in your hand to a rock as big as a car. Volcanic bombs can be thrown for many miles from an erupting vent, and are a significant volcanic hazard for people that are in the eruption zone. Haleakalā volcano is currently “resting”; the last eruption occurred only 400-600 years ago. For more information about the Haleakalā collection, please visit our webpage at https://www.nps.gov/hale/learn/historyculture/collections.htm. The park’s geology handout may be found at this link: https://www.nps.gov/hale/learn/upload/HALE-Site-Bulletin-Geology-2016.pdf (KEM) #objectoftheweek #haleakalā #NPS #npsmuseum #haleakalācollection #HALEmuseum #halehōʻikeʻike #geology #volcanoes #mauihistory #volcanicbomb
Flashback Fridays! Here is a 1951 publication from Hawaii National Park (later separated into Hawaiʻi Volcanoes National Park and Haleakalā National Park). This publication was created by the Naturalist Division of Hawaii National Park and the Hawaii Natural History Association to educate visitors of the natural and cultural history of the two parks. Many National Park units published similar newsletters and booklets over the years spanning the 1920s to the early 2000s. This issue focuses on the Mauna Loa and Kilauea volcanoes located on the Hawaiʻi Island and Haleakalā volcano on Maui. The Nature Note publications from Hawaii National Park can be found at https://www.nps.gov/parkhistory/online_books/hawaii-notes/nn-intro.htm. For more information about the Haleakalā collection, please visit our webpage at https://www.nps.gov/hale/learn/historyculture/collections.htm. (KEM) #objectoftheweek #haleakalā #NPS #npsmuseum #haleakalācollection #HALEmuseum #halehōʻikeʻike #archives #volcanoes #naturenotes
Melicope volcanica (Gray) T.G. Hartley & B.C. Stone or commonly known as volcanic melicope is native to the Hawaiian Islands. Melicope is a genus of the Rutaceae family (Citrus) which Hawaiians collectively call alani and thrives in mesic to wet forests. This genus of plant was formerly part of the Pelea genus, in reference to the Hawaiian Goddess Pele, but has since merged to Melicope. The fragrances of the different species of alani vary from citrus to licorice to rootbeer. The nuts, yielding oil smelling like orange rind, were chewed for therapeutic purposes. The leaves were used as a cosmetic for the skin and faces of young chiefs and portions of the leaf buds were used for ‘ea (thrush) and pā‘ao‘ao (a childhood disease). Some species of alani were used for lei making and perfuming kapa, or Native Hawaiian cloth. For more information about the Haleakalā collection, please visit our webpage at https://www.nps.gov/hale/learn/historyculture/collections.htm. (KEM) #objectoftheweek #haleakalā #NPS #npsmuseum #haleakalācollection #HALEmuseum #halehōʻikeʻike #melicopevolcanica #melicope #pelea #hawaiianbotany #plants #nativeplants #alani
It’s winter on Maui and that means a lot of rain, clouds, and cooler temperatures. Today is one of the sunnier days we have had in a while, although local weather forecasts show more rain to come! Here is a picture taken from our Headquarters visitor center area looking down on the beautiful view while we still have it. If you are planning on coming to Haleakalā During the winter, not all days are like this one. Remember that if you visit the summit, temperatures can be below freezing, especially with the wind chill! Pants, closed toed shoes, and jackets are advised, specifically when you are visiting during sunrise hours. For more information on trails, the park, or more about our weather, visit our website at https://www.nps.gov/hale (CS) #Haleakalā #NPS #sunshine #Maui [Image description: Foreground- Haleakalā shrub land. Background- West Maui Mountains and the valley between Haleakalā and the West Maui mountains. Various clouds litter the sky with bright patches of sun shining down on the island and the ocean surrounding it.] Photo credit: C. Stout
There’s at least one silver sword (‘ahinahina) blooming in the park right now! One of our rangers captured this picture of a silver sword starting its blooming process down in the crater. Silver swords can live between 3 and 90 years (possibly even more). They flower once then die, scattering their seeds. So this one only has a little while longer to live! A reminder to visitors that Haleakalā National Park requires all visitors to stay on designated park trails, paths, and roadways at all times. Hiking off trail disturbs our delicate native plant, insect, and bird species. For more information on trails, the park, or our native plant species, visit our website at https://www.nps.gov/hale (CS) #haleakalā #NPS #ahinahina #silversword Photo credit: C. Stout
This soda bottle was found in Haleakalā National Park. The bottle reads “Property of Maui Soda Works” and is from the Maui Soda and Ice Works Company, located today in Wailuku. The Maui Soda and Ice Works was founded in 1884 by Gibbens & Macauley as an ice and refrigeration company. By the 1920s the company was distributing soft drinks to the community. Judging by the markings on this bottle, it was manufactured in 1931 and could have been left behind at the park by a visitor to Haleakalā; by a member of the Civilian Conservation Corps (CCC) working on the trails; or by a road worker, building the park road. Because we do not know where the bottle was found, or who found it, we will never know. Even though this is a great piece of history, it is important to remember that archeological artifacts are not as useful when information about their origins has been lost. For more information about the Haleakalā collection, please visit our webpage at https://www.nps.gov/hale/learn/historyculture/collections.htm. (KEM) #objectoftheweek #haleakalā #NPS #npsmuseum #haleakalācollection #HALEmuseum #halehōʻikeʻike #mauihistory #maui #historicobject #glassbottle #MauiSodaWorks
What is the difference between a damselfly and a dragonfly? Both damselflies and dragonflies belong to the order Odonata, however they are completely different in appearances. Damselflies have smaller eyes and narrow bodies, while dragonflies have buggy eyes and hefty physiques. Both damselflies and dragonflies have two sets of wings, however the dragonfly’s front and back wings differ in size, while the damselfly’s wings are uniform. When a dragonfly is resting it tends to hold its wings out like an airplane, while the damselfly folds its wings up and together across the top of its back. Exhibited is Megalagrion nigrohamatum nigrohamatum, commonly known as the blackline Hawaiian damselfly. This damselfly is endemic to Hawai‘i and endangered due to habitat loss and predation. The larvae are aquatic and are depredated on by non-native fish. To protect Hawaiian damselflies, we need to protect and prevent degradation to river and stream ecosystems. The first Megalagrion dameslfly arrived in Hawai‘i about 12 million years ago and has diversified into 26 species across the main Hawaiian Islands. Next time you see an insect from the Odonata order, try to identify it as either a damselfly or dragonfly. For more information about the Haleakalā collection, please visit our webpage at https://www.nps.gov/hale/learn/historyculture/collections.htm. (KEM) #objectoftheweek #haleakalā #NPS #npsmuseum #haleakalācollection #HALEmusem #halehōʻikeʻike #naturalhistory #HALEentomology #entomology #endemic #damselfly #odonata #megalagrion
What are Hawaiian makau (fishhooks) made of? Traditionally, makau are made of bone, shell and wood, varying in size and shape depending on the type of fishing they are to be used for. Local artist and master carver Kenneth Hiraoka was commissioned by Haleakalā National Park to make a reproduction of a makau that was found in the Haleakalā wilderness during a 1962 archeological survey. The original object may have been left behind as an offering. To see more Hawaiian fishhooks on display, plan a visit to our Kīpahulu Visitor Center. For more information about the Haleakalā collection, please visit our webpage at https://www.nps.gov/hale/learn/historyculture/collections.htm. (KEM) #haleakalā #NPS #npsmuseum #haleakalācollection #HALEmuseum #halehōʻikeʻike #fishhook #museums #kennethhiraoka #makau #hawaiiancraft #hawaiiancarvings
Have you ever been to Haleakalā National Park and noticed medium-sized birds running around? These non-native birds are called chukars (Alectoris chukar), a Eurasian upland gamebird that was introduced to the Hawaiian Islands by the Territorial Division of Fish and Game in the 1940s. Haleakalā is the perfect environment for these birds because they like to live in high-elevation dry shrubland. Unfortunately, the chukars provide a constant food source for unwanted predators in the park, such as feral cats and mongoose, which threaten the native bird species. The chukar originally came from the Middle East; it is the national bird of both Iraq and Pakistan. In Pakistani and Indian culture, the chuckar sometimes symbolizes intense and often unrequited love. There is even a myth that the chukar is in love with the moon and will gaze at it constantly. If this is true, the chukars that live up at Haleakalā have the perfect view of their love on a dark and clear night. For more information about the Haleakalā collection, please visit our webpage at https://www.nps.gov/hale/learn/historyculture/collections.htm. (KEM) #haleakalā #mauihistory #NPS #npsmuseum #haleakalācollection #HALEmuseum #halehōʻikeʻike #chukar #birds
#Repost @cameraforge1. Mahalo for sharing your hike! #Haleakalā #hike #findyourpark ・・・ Midnight walk up the Pā Ka’oao Trail atop #haleakasummit #maui #sonya7rii #nightscape #nationalparks
#Repost @joedomrad. Mahalo for sharing! #Haleakalā #findyourpark #hike #nationalpark #Maui #Hawaii (MKK) ・・・ First attempt at hyperlapse. Four steps, take picture, repeat. 270 times.
Can you tell we’ve been getting a bit of rain recently? Photo: NPS/K. Lind. #Haleakalā #findyourpark #nationalpark #waterfall #Maui #Hawaii (MKK)
Today is the 83rd anniversary of the official opening of the Haleakalā Highway, which stretches from Kahului to the summit of Haleakalā. Maui’s prime attraction for tourism in the early 1900’s was Haleakalā and during this time there was no road to the summit. An arduous horseback ride was one of the only options for visitors to see the summit. The Maui community worked hard to accommodate visitors to the summit by funding a rest house at Kalahaku in 1894 and later advocating for a road to the summit. In 1928, the National Park Service formally acquired the park lands and started working with the Territory of Hawai‘i to build Haleakalā Highway. On February 23, 1935 a celebration was held for the road’s opening up at Haleakalā National Park. The Maui Chamber of Commerce planned the opening celebration, which included hula, music, talks at the park, and a luau at the Kahului fairgrounds. Over 1,639 people attended with 320 cars making the trek. The ceremony was radio broadcasted from a temporary shed by the National Broadcast Company (NBC) to around sixty-five stations and was said to have reached 10 million people. For more information about the Haleakalā collection, please visit our webpage at https://www.nps.gov/hale/learn/historyculture/collections.htm. (KEM) #haleakalā #mauihistory #NPS #npsmuseum #haleakalācollection #HALEmuseum #halehōʻikeʻie #haleakalāhighway #NPShistory #roads #historicphoto
Clermontia samuelii ssp. samuelii Forbes, commonly known as Hana clermontia, is an endangered plant endemic to the island of Maui. C. samuelii ssp. samuelii is a part of the Hawaiian lobelioid group, which is composed of over 125 species. The Hawaiian lobeliod group is the largest example of adaptive radiation - when organisms diversify rapidly from an ancestral species into a variety of new forms – of any island archipelago in the world. The genus Clermontia was called ‘ōhā wai by the Hawaiians and was carefully gathered for treatment of digestive issues; the sap was also used on open sores. Charles Forbes, the first western botanist to explore the flora of the Haleakalā bogs, described the species. Forbes named C. samuelii ssp. samuelii after Haleakala Ranch Manager Samuel Baldwin, who later spearheaded the trade of Haleakala Ranch lands to the National Park Service in exchange for lands above Kīhei. Today, less than 50 known individuals of C. samuelii ssp. samuelii are known. This specimen is on display at the Haleakalā Visitor center until the end of May, as part of the new exhibit “Following in the Botanist’s Footsteps: Botany of Haleakalā National Park.” For more information about the Haleakalā collection, please visit our webpage at https://www.nps.gov/hale/learn/historyculture/collections.htm. (KEM) #haleakalā #NPS #npsmuseum #haleakalācollection #HALEmuseum #halehōʻikeʻike #HALEherbarium #endemic #clermontia #samuelii #HALEexhibit #Hanaclermontia
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